CAMP'S CASINO BOXERS

BOXERS THRU THE YEARS Sign In or Register to add photos

THIS ALBUM IS MEANT AS A GENERAL HISTORY WITH PHOTOS OF THE MARVELOUS DEVELOPMENT OF THE BOXER BREED -FROM THE EARLY FOUNDATION DOGS TO MORE CURRANT DOGS WHERE TYPE HAS BEEN SET FOR YEARS.I AM IN NO WAY A HISTORIAN AND THE PHOTOS ARE IN VERY LOOSE ORDER . ALL WERE EITHER EMAILED TO ME BY FRIENDS OR FOUND BY A SEARH ON "OLD BOXER PICTURES". I ASSUME SINCE THEY READILY CAME UP AND WERE NOT COPY WRITTEN ON THE SEARCH ENGINE THAT THEY COULD BE USED AND I MEAN NO OFFENSE TO ANYONE IF I HAVE USED THEIR PICTURES WITHOUT PERMISSION.NO DOG PICTURED IN THIS SECTION IS A CASINO KENNELS DOG. I AM FACINATED BY THE BREED AND HOPE THAT PEOPLE WILL RECIEVE AS MUCH ENJOYMENT OUT OF THESE PICTURES AS I HAVE. FOR ALL PHOTOS SCROLL WAYYYY DOWN BELOW THE WRITTEN HISTORY: Part I: Earliest Ancestors The history of the Boxer as a unique breed begins late in the last century in the area of Munich, Germany. As far back as the time of the ancient Assyrians, more than 2000 B.C., a strain of dogs with powerful build, heavy head and great courage was bred and used in war. Centuries later the name of Molossian was given to dogs of this type, named from the city of Molossis in Epirus, in what is today Albania. These dogs spread across the continent and became the ancestors to the German Bullenbeisser. In England, selective breeding produced a taller, stronger dog than the original Mollossis and this formed the foundation of the modern Mastiff. Later the English crossed their Mastiff with fast running hounds to produce the Englische Dogge, or Great Dane, the German national dog. However, the Germans continued to use the Bullenbeisser as a hunting dog. Boxer Ancestors of the Middle Ages to the Late 1700's According to Wagner: "a smaller Bullenbeisser of the purest stock was bred from the larger one by natural selection, due to the spreading popularity of the animal fights from England to the mainland and thence to Germany. Through comparison of Spanish and French authors of the 12th to 14th centuries with authentic English and German sources we find that the so-called Dogge title was used as a collectivism for all strongly built, short-haired chase dogs with large heads, powerfully developed muzzles and triangle-like, stubbed and drooping upper lip, strong bodies and teeth and that the Doggen froms of all European countries from the middle ages up to the present day are limited to three types which have in the course of time developed into national breeds They are: 1. The heavy Bullenbeisser (Mastiff). 2. The large hound evolved by crossing the Bullenbeisser with the old type or Deerhound (The Great Dane). 3. The small Bullenbeisser which represents a smaller form of the heavy Bullenbeisser through natural selection (The Boxer and the English Bulldog). (Bullenbeisser head types) Bullenbeisser, however, knew instinctively how to tackle the game from behind and hold it in a way that kept them from serious injury yet gave the hunters time to reach the kill therefore they were more valuable to the hunt and were accordingly highly prized and painstakingly bred. (Wagner, 1950, p. 27) It is generally accepted that a smaller Bullenbeisser bred in Brabant, an area in Northeast Belgium, is a direct ancestor of today's Boxer. To add historical perspective to current practice Wagner quotes Hans Friedrich v. Flemming of Leipzig (1719), who writes of the Brabanter Bullenbeisser: Their ears are clipped while they are still young and also the tail. (Wagner, 1950, p. 22) Bullengeissers from about 1800 to 1900 By 1800 after the dispersion of hunting Bullenbeisser mentioned above, the small Bullenbeisser was found as a family and guard dog where his remarkable intelligence and tractability endeared him to so large a group of individuals that he carried on when so many breeds completely disappeared.(Wagner, 1950 pp. 32-33) Wagner states: "The literature and paintings previous to 1830 indicate that all Bullenbeisser up to that time were fawn or brindle with black masks. There is never any mention of white. About this time there came a great influx of English dogs to Germany including the English Bulldog. His entry into the country quickly followed by numerous crosses with the Bullenbeisser resulted in an eventual similarity of type that made it very difficult to distinguish where any degree of Bulldog blood was present except that white color began to appear in the Boxers, more of a small mastiff than anything else. The Modern Boxer in Germany It is worth quoting Wagner here: "Meta v. d. Passage played the most important role of the five original ancestors. Our great line of sires all trace directly back to this female. She was a substantially built, low to the ground, brindle and white part-color, lacking in underjaw and exceedingly lippy. As a producing bitch few in any breed can match her record. She consistently whelped puppies of marvelous type and rare quality. Friederun and Philip Stockmann and the Vom Dom Boxers The names Stockmann and Vom Dom are the most important ones in the history of American Boxers. Friederun Stockmann was a young woman from Riga, in the Baltic Region of Germany. She met and married Plutos owner, Philip Stockmann. Frau Stockmann was not on the Boxer scene at the very beginnings of the breed, but she was a major force in the breed very soon thereafter. Frau Stockmann must have been around five when the first Boxer show was held in Munich in 1895. She showed her first Boxer, Laska, a bitch in about 1910. It was one of the twists of fate that two of the greatest dogs that the vom Dom kennels produced were sold to America. Sigurds grandson, Ch. Lustig v. Dom was also sold to America and became Ch. Lustig v. Dob of Tulgey Woods. Lustig was sold only because a great price was offered fro him at a time when the Stockmann family fortunes had reached a nadir. Ironically, though Frau Stockmann never saw him again, the year after Lustig left Germany her husband Philip was invited to judge the show at Westminster and Lustig was there. Again Wagner states: "The two dogs, Int. Ch. Dorian v. Marienhof, the brindle, and Int. Ch. Lustig v. Dob, the fawn, are both in America. They represent the perfected ideal of nearly fifty years of careful breeding of Boxerdom's most aristocratic and finest families. No finer or better-bred Boxers have ever lived. They have both demonstrated their ability to reproduce quality similar to their own." (Wagner, 1950, p.99) Boxers in America: The Four Horsemen of Boxerdom Even though they were German Boxers they must also be recounted in the American history because, in many ways, they were the foundation of American Boxers. Sigurd was the grandsire of the other three Horsemen. Sigurd was whelped in July, 1929, by the Stockmanns, was sold to Charles Ludwig and then to Barmere Kennels in 1934 when he was five years old. Ten of his German sons and daughters were imported and became American champions and left champion get of their own. Fifty-five Sigurds's get made their American championships or left champion progeny. He won Best of Breed at Westminster in 1935. He died on March 3, 1942. Lustig and Utz were full brothers though there was a three year difference in their ages. Their sire was Zorn v. Dom out of Esta v.d. Wurm, making them double Sigurd grandsons. Int. Ch. Lustig sired forty-one American-bred and imported dogs who became American champions. He also produced twenty-five American bred and imported producers. One of Lustig's famous litters was the "B" litter Lilac Hedge Kennels. In this litter, produced by Lustig out of a Dorian daughter, were three females an four males, all of whom finished their American championships. Lustig died on June 14, 1945. Ch. Utz v. Dom, Lustig's full brother, was whelped April 18, 1936. He was imported by the famous Mazelaine Kennels, owned by John Wagner, in 1939. By the end of 1947 he had sired thirty-five champions and sixteen non-champion producers. Like Lustig, Utz had a famous litter, the "N" litter out of Ch. Nocturne of Mazelaine, a Dorian daughter. Utz won the Working Group at Westminster foreshadowing his famous son, Warlord of Mazelaine. He died in 1945, two months before Lustig. Int. Ch. Dorian v. Marienhof is the last of the Great Four. He was whelped in April 1933 from a full brother to tht father of Lustig and Utz, Int. Ch. Xerxes v. Dom from the daughter of another excellent German import. Ch. Check v. Hunnenstein. Dorlan won the Working Group at Westminster in 1937 just one year after he was imported. Some of Dorian's famous get were Chs. Symphony and Serenade of Mazelaine and Ch. Duke Cronian who became the foundation stud of the Sirrah Crest Kennels and the ancestor of Bang Away of Sirrah Crest.
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